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Ancient Historical Photographs

April 16th 2010 23:53
A photograph or photo is an image created by light falling on a light-sensitive surface, usually photographic film or an electronic imager. Most photographs are created using a camera, which uses a lens to focus the scene's visible wavelengths of light into a reproduction of what the human eye would see. The word "photograph" was coined in 1839 by Sir John Herschel and is based on the Greek (phos) "light" and (graphe) "representation by means of lines" or "drawing", together meaning "drawing with light".

Here are some of the earliest photographs ever taken and their historical significance.




First ever photograph
The oldest heliographic engraving known in the world. It is a reproduction of a 17th century Flemish engraving, showing a man leading a horse. It was made by the French inventor Nicéphore Niépce in 1825, with an heliography technical process. The Bibliothèque nationale de France bought it 450,000 € in 2002, deeming it as a 'national treasure'.



historical photos
View from the Window at Le Gras, the first successful permanent photograph created by Nicéphore Niépce in 1826, Saint-Loup-de-Varennes. Captured on 20 × 25 cm oil-treated bitumen. Due to the 8-hour exposure, the buildings are illuminated by the sun from both right and left.




fist photograph of a human
The First Photograph of a Human
Boulevard du Temple, Paris, IIIe arrondissement, Daguerreotype. The purportedly first picture of a living person. The image shows a busy street, but due to exposure time of more than ten minutes, the traffic was moving too much to appear. The exception is the man at the bottom left, who stood still getting his boots polished long enough to show. Note that the image is a mirror image.


first color photograph
First color photograph
Tartan Ribbon, photograph taken by James Clerk Maxwell in 1861. Considered the first colour photograph. Maxwell had the photographer Thomas Sutton photograph a tartan ribbon three times, each time with a different colour filter over the lens. The three images were developed and then projected onto a screen with three different projectors, each equipped with the same colour filter used to take its image. When brought into focus, the three images formed a full colour image.


first high speed photo
Fist High Speed Photograph
In 1887, using a series of trip wires, Eadweard Muybridge created the first high speed photo series which can be run together to give the effect of motion pictures. It helped solve the myth of whether horses ever have all four legs off the ground at the same time.




*This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia page for Photograph.
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The San Francisco Earthquake in Colour

February 1st 2010 01:23
The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 struck on Wednesday, April 18. It ruptured along the San Andreas Fault both northward and southward for a total of 296 miles (477 km). Shaking was felt from Oregon to Los Angeles, and inland as far as central Nevada. The earthquake and resulting fire are remembered as the worst natural disaster in the history of the United States. The death toll from the earthquake and resulting fire, estimated to be above 3,000, is the greatest loss of life from a natural disaster in California's history. The economic impact has been compared with the more recent Hurricane Katrina.

Frederick Eugene Ives was an early adopter of color photography and he took these images of San Francisco 6 months after the quake. These images are at street level at the Majestic Hotel.


san franciso earthquake of 1906


san franciso earthquake in colour


san franciso earthquake in color


colour photography early 1900s. San Francisco.


san franciso earthquake damge and rubble




*This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article for 1906 San Francisco earthquake.
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The Decade That Was

January 18th 2010 13:56
As the first decade of the new millennium slips us by, msnbc takes a look back at the decade in pictures. It's amazing what can happen in 10 short years. Below are a small number of the major events, read the full list and article here.

Concorde crash of 2000
2000: Concorde in flames
A passenger in another plane snapped this photo of Air France Flight 4590 as the Concorde trailed flames during its takeoff from Paris on July 25. Moments later, the supersonic jet crashed, killing all 109 people on board and five more on the ground.


September 11 terrorist attacks
2001: 9/11 impact
Hijacked United Airlines Flight 175 from Boston crashes into the south tower of the World Trade Center and explodes at 9:03 a.m. on Sept. 11 in New York City. The crash of two airliners hijacked by terrorists loyal to al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden caused the collapse of the twin towers. A third airliner was crashed into the Pentagon in Arlingon, Va., and a fourth into a field in Shanksville, Pa. In total, 2,974 victims and the 19 hijackers died in the attacks.


Saddam Hussein Statue Topples
2003: Statue of Saddam topples
A statue of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein falls in central Baghdad on April 9. U.S. troops pulled down the 20-foot-high statue as Iraqis danced on the surrounding plaza. For many, the scenes were reminiscent of the 1989 fall of the Berlin Wall. Despite the seeming quick victory, 2003 was just the start of a U.S.-led occupation of Iraq that lasted through 2009.


Indian Ocean Tsunami
2004: Tsunami's devastation
A woman mourns Dec. 28 in Cuddalore, India, over the death of a relative in a tsunami that struck around the Indian Ocean two days before. A magnitude 9.0 earthquake triggered massive waves, killing more than 200,000 and dislocating millions in one of the worst natural disasters in modern history.


Abu Ghraib Torture Scandal
2004: Abu Ghraib scandal
Pfc. Lynndie England of the 372nd Military Police Company holds a leash around the neck of a man at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison in this image published in The Washington Post on May 6. In September 2005, England was sentenced to three years in prison in a court-martial for abuses at Abu Ghraib.


Hurricane Katrina - New Orleans
2005: Makeshift memorial to New Orleans resident
A makeshift tomb at a New Orleans street corner Sept. 4 conceals a body that had been lying on the sidewalk for days in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. The Category 4 storm had hit the city almost a week earlier, on Aug. 29. Nearly 2,000 people died in the hurricane and subsequent floods, making it one of the deadliest storms in U.S. history.


west bank evacuation
2006: Resisting West Bank evacuation
A Jewish settler struggles with Israeli security officers as authorities evacuate the Amona settlement in the West Bank on Feb. 1. Thousands of troops clashed with hundreds of settlers after the Supreme Court cleared the way for the demolition of nine homes in the illegal settlement.


Lehman Brothers Executives. Financial Crisis
2008: Lehman Brothers executive heckled
Protesters hold signs behind Richard Fuld, chairman and chief executive of Lehman Brothers Holdings. Fuld testified Oct. 6 before a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing in Washington on the causes and effects of the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy.


President Obama Inauguration
2009: Obama makes history
Barack Obama takes the oath of office from Chief Justice John Roberts, not seen, as his wife, Michelle, holds the Lincoln Bible and daughters Sasha, right, and Malia watch at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Tuesday Jan. 20.
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Nostradamus

January 15th 2010 06:36
Nostradamus (14 December or 21 December 1503 – 2 July 1566), was a practicing physician, astronomer and astrologer who turned his hand to prophecy later in life.

Nostradamus wrote is prophecies in quatrains. Prophesising was punishable by death during the Spanish Inquisition, so he was forced to be cryptic to avoid persecution. Some say he predicted the French Revolution, the birth and rise to power of Hitler, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Great Fire of London (1666) and the September 11th terror attacks.

The Science Channel takes a closer look at Nostradamus more famous predictions, could Nostradamus really see the future, or do their vagueness and lack of dating make it easy to quote them selectively after every major dramatic event and retrospectively claim them as "hits"? Read the full article here.


nostradamus predictions for atomic bomb
Atomic Bomb

Near the gates and within two cities
There will be scourges the like of which was never seen,
Famine within plague, people put out by steel,
Crying to the great immortal God for relief.


It's an accurate description of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

With that said, this verse is accurate because it cheats a bit on the specifics. Critics charge that it's so vague that it could also be used to describe a whole host of wartime atrocities during any of many wars that took place between Nostradamus' time in the 16th century and today ... or even the future.


nostradamus predicted hurricane katrina
Hurricane Katrina

The cities of Tours, Orleans, Blois, Angers, Reims and Nantes
Are troubled by sudden change.
Tents will be pitched by (people) of foreign tongues;
Rivers, darts at Rennes, shaking of land and sea.


Did he really mean NEW Orleans? Hmm...The shaking of land and sea might describe the hurricane (well, the shaking of the sea would). Could the people with foreign tongues be aid workers from other parts of the world, or other parts of the country?

But what are Tours, Blois, Angers, Reims and Nantes doing there?

Pre-Katrina, this prophecy was originally thought to refer to France.


prophecies of nostradamus
Great Fire of London

The blood of the just will commit a fault at London,
Burnt through lighting of twenty threes the six:
The ancient lady will fall from her high place,
Several of the same sect will be killed.


The Great Fire of London obliterated nearly all of medieval London ("the ancient lady") within the old Roman walls. It occurred in 1666, and only six deaths were recorded (hence "the six" in the second line), though commoners' deaths may not have been recorded at the time.

The fire, which started in a baker's shop, burned for three days straight. If only someone had passed along a copy of Nostadamus' book, maybe Londoners might have known it was coming.


Nostradamus online
The French Revolution

"From the enslaved populace, songs,
Chants and demands
While princes and lords are held captive in prisons.
These will in the future by headless idiots
Be received as divine prayers"


The peasants ("the enslaved populace") rising to power, the aristocracy taken down and beheaded (the "headless idiots," now "princes and lords ... held captive in prisons"). In another verse, the "great wall" falling is said to mean the storming of the Bastille.

Is it possible that Nostradamus saw the coming of a peasant uprising through completely non-astrological or occult means, but through his own eyes as he saw the contrast between aristocrat and commoner in 16th-century France?


nostradamus predictions for the September 11th terrorist attacks.
September 11th, 2001

Earthshaking fire from the center of the Earth
Will cause tremors around the New City.
Two great rocks will war for a long time,
Then Arethusa will redden a new river.


If you read this verse before Sept. 11, you might assume it referred to an earthquake or volcanic eruption. Earthshaking fire, tremors, rocks warring (in other words, continental plates colliding), but who really knows.

Back when Nostradamus wrote those lines, skyscrapers like the Twin Towers, jumbo jets like the ones that hit them and cities like modern-day New York were probably unthinkable and unimaginable, so if he foresaw these events, would he have even known what he was seeing?
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Nostradamus

January 15th 2010 06:36
Nostradamus (14 December or 21 December 1503 – 2 July 1566), was a practicing physician, astronomer and astrologer who turned his hand to prophecy later in life.

Nostradamus wrote is prophecies in quatrains. Prophesising was punishable by death during the Spanish Inquisition, so he was forced to be cryptic to avoid persecution. Some say he predicted the French Revolution, the birth and rise to power of Hitler, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Great Fire of London (1666) and the September 11th terror attacks.

The Science Channel takes a closer look at Nostradamus more famous predictions, could Nostradamus really see the future, or do their vagueness and lack of dating make it easy to quote them selectively after every major dramatic event and retrospectively claim them as "hits"? Read the full article here.


nostradamus predictions for atomic bomb
Atomic Bomb

Near the gates and within two cities
There will be scourges the like of which was never seen,
Famine within plague, people put out by steel,
Crying to the great immortal God for relief.


It's an accurate description of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

With that said, this verse is accurate because it cheats a bit on the specifics. Critics charge that it's so vague that it could also be used to describe a whole host of wartime atrocities during any of many wars that took place between Nostradamus' time in the 16th century and today ... or even the future.


nostradamus predicted hurricane katrina
Hurricane Katrina

The cities of Tours, Orleans, Blois, Angers, Reims and Nantes
Are troubled by sudden change.
Tents will be pitched by (people) of foreign tongues;
Rivers, darts at Rennes, shaking of land and sea.


Did he really mean NEW Orleans? Hmm...The shaking of land and sea might describe the hurricane (well, the shaking of the sea would). Could the people with foreign tongues be aid workers from other parts of the world, or other parts of the country?

But what are Tours, Blois, Angers, Reims and Nantes doing there?

Pre-Katrina, this prophecy was originally thought to refer to France.


prophecies of nostradamus
Great Fire of London

The blood of the just will commit a fault at London,
Burnt through lighting of twenty threes the six:
The ancient lady will fall from her high place,
Several of the same sect will be killed.


The Great Fire of London obliterated nearly all of medieval London ("the ancient lady") within the old Roman walls. It occurred in 1666, and only six deaths were recorded (hence "the six" in the second line), though commoners' deaths may not have been recorded at the time.

The fire, which started in a baker's shop, burned for three days straight. If only someone had passed along a copy of Nostadamus' book, maybe Londoners might have known it was coming.


Nostradamus online
The French Revolution

"From the enslaved populace, songs,
Chants and demands
While princes and lords are held captive in prisons.
These will in the future by headless idiots
Be received as divine prayers"


The peasants ("the enslaved populace") rising to power, the aristocracy taken down and beheaded (the "headless idiots," now "princes and lords ... held captive in prisons"). In another verse, the "great wall" falling is said to mean the storming of the Bastille.

Is it possible that Nostradamus saw the coming of a peasant uprising through completely non-astrological or occult means, but through his own eyes as he saw the contrast between aristocrat and commoner in 16th-century France?


nostradamus predictions for the September 11th terrorist attacks.
September 11th, 2001

Earthshaking fire from the center of the Earth
Will cause tremors around the New City.
Two great rocks will war for a long time,
Then Arethusa will redden a new river.


If you read this verse before Sept. 11, you might assume it referred to an earthquake or volcanic eruption. Earthshaking fire, tremors, rocks warring (in other words, continental plates colliding), but who really knows.

Back when Nostradamus wrote those lines, skyscrapers like the Twin Towers, jumbo jets like the ones that hit them and cities like modern-day New York were probably unthinkable and unimaginable, so if he foresaw these events, would he have even known what he was seeing?
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Prohibition

December 26th 2009 06:37
As reported in the Chicago Tribune, December 5th marked exactly 75 years since the repeal of prohibition in the United States.

Coming into effect on January 16, 1920. After 13 years prohibition had become increasingly unpopular. Production, importation, and distribution of alcoholic beverages — once the province of legitimate business — were taken over by criminal gangs, which fought each other for market control in violent confrontations, including mass murder. Major gangsters, such as Omaha's Tom Dennison, and Chicago's Al Capone, became wealthy and were admired locally and nationally. Enforcement was difficult because the gangs became so rich they were often able to bribe underpaid and understaffed law-enforcement personnel and pay for expensive lawyers. Those inclined to help authorities were often intimidated, even murdered. Many citizens were sympathetic to bootleggers, and respectable citizens were lured by the romance of illegal speakeasies. The loosening of social mores during the 1920s included popularising the cocktail and the cocktail party among higher socio-economic groups. In several major cities — notably those that served as major points of liquor importation (including Chicago and Detroit) gangs wielded significant political power. A Michigan State Police raid in Detroit once netted the mayor, the sheriff, and the local congressman


[ Click here to read more ]
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Notorious Assassinations

December 18th 2009 06:49
Many well known public figures have been murdered over time, usually for religious, ideological, political, or military reasons.
This article at Life.com covers many of them and below is a selection.
The full article contains many of the most famous assassinations including Abraham Lincoln, the Kennedys, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King and more


[ Click here to read more ]
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Howard Hughes

December 16th 2009 01:23
Howard Robard Hughes, Jr. (December 24, 1905 – April 5, 1976) was an American aviator, engineer, industrialist, film producer, film director, philanthropist, and one of the wealthiest people in the world. He was also a famous recluse, especially in later life.

Hughes most well known aircraft is the H-4 Hercules or Spruce Goose. It is the world's largest flying boat, the largest aircraft made from wood, and, at 319 feet 11 inches (97.51 m), at the time had the biggest wingspan of any aircraft ever built


[ Click here to read more ]
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Early Native American Pictures

December 14th 2009 20:37
As reported in this article in the Denver Post, in the early 1900s, William Pennington and Lisle Updike spent most days travelling the four corners area of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico and Arizona in a wagon photographing the people and landscapes.

William Pennington and Lisle Updike formed their business partnership about 1908 and opened a portrait studio in Durango, Colorado


[ Click here to read more ]
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Whaling History

December 2nd 2009 07:19
Whaling History
The Whaler: Nootka Indian, in British Columbia, Circa 1910

The hunting of whales dates back to at least 3,000 BC. The evolution of traditional Arctic whaling developed with increasing rapidity by early organized fleets in the 17th century; competitive national whaling industries in the 18th and 19th centuries; and the introduction of factory ships along with the concept of whale "harvesting" in the first half of the 20th century. In the late 1930s more than 50,000 whales were killed annually.

[ Click here to read more ]
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Fall of the Berlin Wall

November 30th 2009 01:28
November 9th, 2009 marked the 20th anniversary of the day the Berlin Wall came down. Built with barbed wire and concrete in August of 1961 by the Communist East, The Berlin Wall, stretching for about 30 miles, was a Cold War symbol which separated East and West Berlin, preventing people from leaving East Germany. It is believed that least 938 people – 255 in Berlin alone – died, shot by East German border guards, attempting to flee to West Berlin or West Germany. It stood for 28 years as a division between the Soviets and the Allies. The wall was torn down after Communism collapsed in 1989. During the summer of 1989, tens of thousands of East Germans fled the communist regime. The photos below show the initial building of the Wall in 1961, the fall of the Wall in 1989 and how the sections of the Wall look today including comparisons of how Berlin looked before and after the wall was torn down. The images and information sourced from the Denver Post. Read the full article here.

Early Berlin Wall
An East German soldier of the border guard patrols along the barbed wire fence between the French and Soviet sector in the Schoenholz district in Berlin, Germany, September 25, 1961. A family, in the background, is forced to leave their home close to the sector's border and loads their belongings onto a truck


[ Click here to read more ]
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Stereoviews of Life in old Japan

November 23rd 2009 01:31
In the late 19th and early 20th century photographer T. Enami captured a number of 3D stereoviews depicting life in Japan.

A stereoview consists of a pair of nearly identical images that appear three-dimensional when viewed through a stereoscope, because each eye sees a slightly different image. This illusion of depth can also be recreated with animated GIFs like the ones here, which were created from Flickr images posted by Okinawa Soba, and put together by pinktentacle.com. See the full set here
[ Click here to read more ]
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Great Chicago Fire

October 26th 2009 01:43
great chicago fire
Corner of Wabash and Washington Streets. The ruins of the Second Presbyterian Church are in the background

The Great Chicago Fire burned from Sunday, October 8, to early Tuesday, October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. Though the fire was one of the largest U.S. disasters of the 19th century, the rebuilding that began almost immediately spurred Chicago's development into one of the most populous and economically important American cities.
Great Chicago Fire of 1871
Looking towards Chicago River

[ Click here to read more ]
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World's Most Important Drugs

October 16th 2009 00:56
What are the most important drugs ever discovered or made throughout the history of mankind, and what are the highest selling drugs of today?
Next Generation Pharmaceutical put together this list with the help of doctors and historians.

[ Click here to read more ]
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